Penda Designs Modular Timber Tower Inspired by Habitat 67 for Toronto | ArchDaily

Penda Designs Modular Timber Tower Inspired by Habitat 67 for Toronto,Courtesy of Penda

 

Penda, collaborating with wood consultants from CLT-brand Tmber, has unveiled the design of ‘Tree Tower Toronto,’ an 18-story timber-framed mixed-use residential skyscraper for Canada’s largest city. Drawing inspiration from the distinctly Canadian traditional modular construction, including Moshe Safdie’s iconic Habitat 67, the tower is envisioned as a new model of sustainable high-rise architecture that can establish a reconnect urban areas to nature and natural materials.

Source: Penda Designs Modular Timber Tower Inspired by Habitat 67 for Toronto | ArchDaily

Who Are The True Builders?

You look in your history-books to see who built Westminster Abbey, who built St Sophia at Constantinople, and they tell you Henry Ill, Justinian the Emperor. Did they? Or, rather, men like you and me, handicraftsmen, who have left no names behind them, nothing but their work?

William Morris, “The Lesser Arts” (1878) quoted in “VISTA – the culture and politics of gardens”

How One of the World’s Densest Cities Has Gone Green

Picture of SuperTrees at Gardens by the Bay

Symbol of Singapore, these “Supertrees” belong to a display at the 250-acre Gardens by the Bay. The high-tech structures range from 80 to 160 feet and collect solar energy to power a nightly light show. They have a softer side too: their trunks are vertical gardens, laced with more than 150,000 living plants.

Source: How One of the World’s Densest Cities Has Gone Green

Designing History: 7 Modern Museums in Portugal – Architizer

 

Although many Portuguese towns and cities are characterized by well-preserved, historic architecture, some contemporary architects are using modern ideas to advance this traditional language of design. At the same time, Portuguese designers are careful to maintain and honor the legacy of artists and architects who came before them. Museums in particular play a key role in these preservation efforts by containing and exhibiting this history, but just as importantly, by embodying it, and becoming a modern interpretation of the very traditions it investigates. It is not enough for a building to display important cultural histories and artifacts if the museum’s design is not sensitive to this program. This is especially important when a nation’s architecture and urban planning are themselves of great historical significance.

 

Source: Designing History: 7 Modern Museums in Portugal – Architizer

Amsterdam Central Station’s Bold, Watery Revamp – CityLab

Canals, boats, bikes, trains – what more could you ask for? What is now tarmac and piles of chained up parked bikes will become a great public space.

 

Designs for Amsterdam's Central Station

Widened canals—and underground bike parking—will bring the city’s Central Station a little closer to nature and history.

Source: Amsterdam Central Station’s Bold, Watery Revamp – CityLab

WAN:: Timber tower by Team V Architecture

Timber tower by Team V Architecture

 

With construction due to start in the second half of 2017 HAUT is on track to become the world’s tallest timber tower The municipality of Amsterdam in the Netherlands has selected Team V Architecture with Lingotto, Nicole Maarsen, ARUP and brand partner NLE to develop a building that is a serious contender to become the tallest timber tower in the world.HAUT, will be a 21-storey wooden residential building by the Dutch River Amstel with construction work expected to start in the second half of 2017. HAUT promises to be a prototype of building in an innovative, sustainable and environmentally-friendly manner.

Source: WAN:: Timber tower by Team V Architecture

Got wood? Meet Australia’s tallest (proposed) timber building | News | Archinect

 

Combine cross laminated timber, glue laminated timber, and the desire to connect with nature while providing ample creative working space, and you have the 5 King Tower, a 52-meter timber structure with the strength of concrete and steel (but a much smaller carbon footprint).

Source: Got wood? Meet Australia’s tallest (proposed) timber building | News | Archinect

Pakistan’s Moenjodaro is crumbling away | Pakistan | Al Jazeera

“If our estimates are proven correct, Moenjodaro was probably a cosmopolitan city of its times. I have said it time and again that, 5,000 years ago, when people in Europe and other places lived in caves and jungles, people in Moenjodaro lived in brick houses in a civilised and planned city,” Qasim says.

 

Source: Pakistan’s Moenjodaro is crumbling away | Pakistan | Al Jazeera

Toronto’s skyline is about to join the big-leagues: What the city could look like in 2020 | Toronto Star

Toronto's vibrant downtown holds some advantages over many vertically ambitious cities, says the city’s former urban design and architecture chief.

 

Toronto’s skyline is entering the stratosphere… at least by North American standards. A look at what 10 new projects will mean to the city, its residents and its image.

Source: Toronto’s skyline is about to join the big-leagues: What the city could look like in 2020 | Toronto Star

Paris allows anyone to plant an urban garden | Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

Paris, France, greenery, plants, plant, garden, gardens, public space, public spaces, creative gardens, alternative gardens, living wall, living walls, green wall, green walls, rooftop garden, rooftop gardens

Paris just passed a new law that allows anyone to plant an urban garden within the city’s limits. Upon receiving a permit, gardeners can grow plants on walls, in boxes, on rooftops, under trees, or on fences. They can cultivate greenery in front of their homes or offices. They can grow flowers, vegetables, and fruit. Paris mayor Anne Hidalgo’s goal is to create 100 hectares of living walls and green roofs by the year 2020, with one third of that greenery dedicated to agriculture.

Source: Paris allows anyone to plant an urban garden | Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

Finland’s longest bridge will be a beautiful pedestrian and cyclist superhighway | Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

Knight Architects, WSP Finland, Kruunusillat bridge, pedestrian bridge, Finland, longest bridge in Finland, Helsinki, cable-stayed bridge, walkway, cyclists, pedestrian-friendly design

 

 

The architects collaborated with engineering firm WSP Finland to design this tram, cyclist and pedestrian bridge, the name of which translates to Crown Bridges in Finnish. The €259 million…

Source: Finland’s longest bridge will be a beautiful pedestrian and cyclist superhighway | Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building

NEXT Architects design a swooping “Mobius strip” bridge for Changsha, China | News | Archinect

Credit: NEXT architects

The Dutch-Chinese firm NEXT Architects has a well-deserved reputation for designing eye-catching bridges. Their latest project, a bright red, Mobius strip-like pedestrian bridge for the Chinese city of Changsha, is set to become another jewel in their portfolio.

185 metres long and 24 metres tall, the “Lucky Knot” bridge will span the Dragon King Harbour River in Changsha’s ‘New Lake District’ development. The bridge will offer views of the nearby Meixi Lake and the mountain range that surrounds the city.

Source: NEXT Architects design a swooping “Mobius strip” bridge for Changsha, China | News | Archinect

Top Websites – 2016 | Planetizen: The independent resource for people passionate about planning and related fields

The annual list of the best planning, design, and development websites, representing some of the top online resources for news, information, and research on the built environment.

Source: Top Websites – 2016 | Planetizen: The independent resource for people passionate about planning and related fields

Submit Your Ideas to The Architectural Review to Stop the Spread of #Notopia | ArchDaily

In its recent issues, The Architectural Review has been on a mission, highlighting a phenomenon that they have named “Notopia.” Characterized by a “loss of identity and cultural vibrancy” and “a global pandemic of generic buildings,” Notopia is – in overly simplistic terms – a consequence of the cold logic of market forces combined with a disinterested populace. The AR’s campaign therefore aims to analyze this “thing of terror” and push back by raising public awareness and by proposing alternatives. And they need your help.

 

Source: Submit Your Ideas to The Architectural Review to Stop the Spread of #Notopia | ArchDaily